Goals & Gratitude

It’s been about three months since I packed up my things and moved across the world to Israel. Things can be disorienting, strange, and uncomfortable when you move to a new country regardless of how much you prepare yourself mentally. There have been challenges that I anticipated (sharing a room, lack of certain creature comforts, homesickness) and those that were unexpected (how much the language barrier would impact me and cultural differences between schools in the U.S. and Israel). But even with these challenges, there is a strong feeling of appreciation for the people and things in my life here that make me feel at home or provide comfort, distraction, or happiness that is unlike anything I have experienced. Below are some of those things. … More Goals & Gratitude

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The Story The News Will Never Write: A Reflection on July 26th, 2016 in East Jerusalem

I cannot tow a line in fear of not offending someone, so I write this piece with the utmost honesty and respect, acknowledging that my perspective is limited and yet, that my personal narrative has value. … More The Story The News Will Never Write: A Reflection on July 26th, 2016 in East Jerusalem

Finding My Place in the Tabenkin School

Now I have been working at Tabenkin for over a month. I have worked at many summer camps, but I have never felt this kind of connection with any kids I have worked with before. My hebrew has improved, I have bonded with the other counselors, and my time spent with the kids continues to be the highlight of my day. When I go home for the weekend I miss the class. When I am with them I feel like I belong. There is nothing I would rather do with my day than spend it at Tabenkin school. In all honesty I have contemplated not coming back to the USA, and instead continuing to work with these kids for the year. I know that this is not realistic, but I can’t imagine being happier doing anything else. … More Finding My Place in the Tabenkin School

An Internship That’s Not Just Coffee And Copies

Specifically, we want to open dialogues with women about their abilities to discuss if and when to have children with their husbands, as well as the notion that they have agencies over their own bodies, while respecting the fact that both of these ideas are both radical and potentially off-putting to members of the Eritrean community. As we move forward, we will strive to put together a program that respects the norms and values of the community, while simultaneously promoting the benefits of family planning from health and economic standpoints. … More An Internship That’s Not Just Coffee And Copies

Speak in Hebrew!

The 12 year-old girl I tutor through Yahel at the Learning Center in the Matnas (the local JCC) has made my accent her personal mission for the year. At the end of our English sessions, she picks out Hebrew children’s books and has me read to her, laughing at my weak “lamed” (ל) or American-ized “shin” (ש). Although according to her, my accent level is that of a preschooler (based on her choice of books about teddy bears and zoo animals), she is patient with me as I grant her the same patience with her proununciation of English words. By trading positions in the learning dynamic, she is able to gain skills as the teacher and I can truly understand what it is like to be the student struggling with a new, foreign language. … More Speak in Hebrew!